BodiTrak, Putting Rhythm, Balance, and Lateral Motion Research

During a recent putting clinic covering rhythm and tempo I wanted to examine what happens to balance during the stroke. The players all accomplished a ‘before’ 10 foot putt standing on the BodiTrak mat then we jumped into training. We worked with basic mechanics first, then progressed to something different: each player simply was asked to walk around the putting green. I counted the beats for each individuals tempo, and then instructed each golfer on the musical technique of triplets (learned from my daughter, Rachel, with a music performance degree). So as you walk during sets of two steps count 1-2-3. The first count starts the stroke; 2: is the backstroke, and 3: is the finish (see Isocrony, edbrittongolf.com, June 15, 2015). What that did was expose each player to a tempo mostly quicker that what they were used to. Then we practiced distance control focusing only on each players new rhythm and tempo. Distance control improved, but BodiTrak data also changed. Pressure traces had small balance adjustments. However, Center of Pressure-Velocity changes were dramatic.

This is an example of before and after; bottom is before, top after. At impact the lateral pressures are almost the same. The biggest change was the left foot heal-toe relationship; before pulled putts, after slight push. The next picture shows the surprise!
The Center of Pressure Velocity trace dramatically changed: direct relationship to distance control. Again bottom is before. This golfer moved away from the target at 65 centimeters per second at impact. Why? During his stroke he counterbalances his body to the stroke of the putter head (like a golfer who counterbalances to the back foot with a driver; just smaller). His focus is on the club instead of how his body is moving; the club, therefore, counter balances to him. After focusing on his new thought of 1-2-3 his lateral motion changed to one centimeter per second toward the target. He was very happy about distance control.
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   2 Comments


  1. Gordon Bennett
      March 22, 2019

    Interesting…so did they become quicker than the “perfect” 2:1? Are you saying they are more apt to find their natural putting rhythm – and that can be quite different from what most instructors try to jam their students into?

    • edbr6749
        March 22, 2019

      2:1 ratio stands; what changes is the tempo. Like playing a song at different speeds; you still hear the same rhythm. Everyone has their personal tempo.

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